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Student Guide '07

LIFESTYLE ENTERTAINMENT

CU CENTERSTAGE

CU Concerts
www.cuconcerts.org

Artist Series

For more than 70 years, the Artist Series has been bringing the world's finest jazz, classical, world music and dance performers to Boulder. We invite you to join the more than 16,000 Artist Series patrons who come every year to experience both world-renowned and emerging artists. Last season many Artist Series performances sold out; order season tickets today to guarantee the best seats. All Artist Series performances take place in historic Macky Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Arturo Sandoval
"Mr. Sandoval's playing is unabashedly spectacular, yet he uses his technique with dramatic finesse." New York Times
Thursday, Sept. 20, 2007, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
Cuban-born trumpeter Arturo Sandoval was a protégé of the legendary Dizzy Gillespie and a founder of the ground-breaking band Irakere. Winner of four Grammy Awards, six Billboard Awards and an Emmy, Sandoval is internationally recognized as one of the most important figures in Latin jazz and a phenomenal classical trumpeter, as well.

First Person: Stories from the Edge of the World
"There's an ease about the way they play that seems to break down the barriers that normally exist between the audience and the performer." Performance Today
Friday, Oct. 5, 2007, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
First Person: Stories from the Edge of the World is a remarkable collaboration between National Geographic, National Public Radio's Neal Conan and Ensemble Galilei. Spectacular photographs projected on a large on-stage screen, Neal Conan's compelling narration of original texts by the world's great explorers and evocative music created specifically for this project work seamlessly to take the audience along on some of the world's most extraordinary expeditions.

Yamato
"A breathtaking big bang." Daily Telegraph
Sunday, Oct. 14, 2007, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
The dynamic young men and women of Yamato reinterpret the ancient traditions of Taiko drumming. Hailing from Nara, Japan, Yamato returns to the Artist Series by popular demand. One part music, one part dance and all spectacle, their performances draw strength from ancestral Japanese spiritual beliefs about the power of the drum.

Boston Brass
"More powerful than a speeding locomotive." Charleston Daily Mail
Thursday, Nov. 8, 2007, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
From exciting classical arrangements to breathtaking harmony, Boston Brass achieves new levels in brass performance while treating audiences to a unique musical experience. The ensemble's lively repartee bridges classical formality to delight audiences with boisterous fun, insightful knowledge and an enthusiastic love of music. With a host of original arrangements, Boston Brass has pioneered a new generation of music that sets out to achieve one simple goal: entertain with outstanding precision.

Trio Medižval
"Using just the faintest hint of vibrato, the singers immediately demonstrated their immaculate blend and nuanced control, and the beauty of their clear, fluid voices." New York Times
Saturday, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
The brilliant young Scandinavian sopranos of Trio Medižval specialize in a diverse repertoire that features polyphonic medieval music from England and France, contemporary works written for the ensemble, and traditional Norwegian ballads and songs. Founded in Oslo in 1997, Trio Medižval has since released three acclaimed recordings including two on the Billboard Top 10 Bestsellers.

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo
"The Trocks are a guaranteed hoot for people who know nothing of ballet and an absolute must for those who think they know the originals." Sydney Star Observer
Friday, Jan. 25, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
Dancing the fine line between high art and high camp, Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo delight audiences around the world. Parodying classical works from Swan Lake to Giselle and the choreography of Isadora Duncan, George Balanchine and Martha Graham, the Trocks (as they are affectionately known) offer irresistible evenings for dance aficionados and complete novices. Combining a loving knowledge of dance with a wicked comedic sensibility, this all-male ensemble offers buoyant and hilarious evenings for young and old.

Piotr Anderszewski
"He has very pronounced and personal ideas on the repertoire he plays, and the results are so utterly musical that verbal descriptions tend to detract from the sheer poetry and dynamism that he so potently fuses." Daily Telegraph
Friday, Feb. 22, 2008, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
Polish-Hungarian pianist Piotr Anderszewski is widely regarded as one of the most exciting pianists of his generation. Since first coming to public attention at the 1990 Leeds Piano Competition, he received the Gilmore Artist Award and has become a familiar figure on the international concert platform, recognized for the intensity and originality of his interpretations.

Perú Negro
"Who knew a showcase of Afro-Peruvian cultural traditions could be so much unadulterated fun... imbued with theatrical flair and charming comic digressions." Boston Globe
Tuesday, March 4, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
"A nonstop carnival of rhythm" (LA Times), Perú Negro's high-energy show features festive and celebratory dances interwoven with vibrant live music. Formed more than 35 years ago to preserve Peru's African heritage, Perú Negro has performed all over the world and been appointed "Ambassadors of Peruvian Culture" by the Peruvian Government. Perú Negro's second U.S.-released album Jolgorio received both a Grammy and a Latin Grammy nomination.

The Eroica Effect with Andrew Manze and the HSO
"Through speaking and conducting, [Manze] renders the concert experience utterly comprehensible and consummately enjoyable." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Saturday, April 5, 2008, 7:30
Tickets: $12 to $52
After hearing Beethoven's Symphony No. 3 "Eroica," Haydn declared that music would never be the same again. In words and live musical excerpts, renowned conductor and violinist Andrew Manze unlocks the secrets and untangles the myths behind perhaps the greatest of all symphonies. He then leads a full performance of the masterwork featuring Scandinavia's Helsingborg Symphony. Experience Eroica with fresh ears and a genuine sense of appreciation and discovery.

ODC Dance
"On a Train Heading South... deliver(ed) the goods with imagination, urgency and a wicked sense of humor... it's superb." San Francisco Chronicle
Saturday, April 12, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 to $52
ODC Dance is known throughout the world for its athleticism, passion and intellectual depth. Founded at Oberlin College in 1971 by Artistic Director Brenda Way (who trained under the legendary George Balanchine), ODC relocated to San Francisco in 1976 on a big yellow school bus, bucking the dance world theory that to be successful a company must locate itself in New York City. The program's centerpiece On a Train Heading South explores the impact of global warming.



International Film Series, Fall '07

www.internationalfilmseries.com

The International Film Series is an art-house film program that shows more than 100 films a year. Most films are screened in Muenzinger Auditorium (Room E050), just west of Folsom Field on the CU-Boulder campus. Admission to the majority of events is $5 for the general public and $4 for CU-Boulder students with a valid I.D. For special or festival screenings, other prices may apply. For further information, call 303-492-1531, or visit www.internationalfilmseries.com.

Chris Meloni (in person) — Wed., Sept. 12, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

The Guatemalan Handshake — Thu., Sept. 13, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea — Fri., Sept. 14, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Brand Upon the Brain! — Sun., Sept. 16, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Killer of Sheep — Wed., Sept. 19, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Pierrot le fou — Thu., Sept. 20, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Ten Canoes — Fri., Sept. 21, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Election — Thu., Sept. 27, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Triad Election — Fri., Sept. 28, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Monty Python's Life of Brian (with director Terry Jones in person) — Sun., Sept. 30, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Toi et Moi — Wed., Oct. 3, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Bled Number One — Thu., Oct. 4, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

La Trahison — Fri., Oct. 5, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Ma Vie en L'air — Sat., Oct. 6, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Johnny the Giant Killer (with live musical accompaniment by Gutbucket) — Sun., Oct. 10, 7 p.m., at ATLAS 102

Into Great Silence — Wed., Oct. 10, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

The Pornographers — Thu., Oct. 11, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Tale of a Gypsy Caravan — Fri., Oct. 12, 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

No End in Sight — Sat., Oct. 13, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Sound of the Soul — Sun., Oct. 14, 7 p.m., at ATLAS 102

Manufactured Landscapes — Wed., Oct. 17, 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Pigs and Battleships — Thu., Oct. 18, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation (with director and

producer in person) — Fri., Oct. 19, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Darkon — Sun., Oct. 21, 7 p.m., at ATLAS 102

Dead Man Walking — Wed., Oct. 24, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

The Draughtsman's Contact — Thu., Oct. 25, 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

A Zed and Two Noughts — Fri., Oct. 26, 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Exiled — Sat., Oct. 27, 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Tony Castle (in person) — Sun., Oct. 21, 7 p.m., at ATLAS 102

Antonioni and Bergman — Wed., Oct. 31, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., at ATLAS 102

The Insect Woman — Thu., Nov. 1, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Sundance Shorts — Fri., Nov. 2, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Walking to Werner (with Alan Caudillo in person) — Sun., Nov. 4, 7 p.m., at ATLAS 102

Bamako — Wed., Nov. 7, 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

The Profound Desire of the Gods — Thu., Nov. 8, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

SDIFF at IFS: Satellite Screenings — Fri., Sat., and Sun., Nov 9, 10, and 11, times pending, at Muenzinger Auditorium

Vengeance is Mine — Thu., Nov. 15, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

Milarepa — Fri. and Sat., Nov. 16 and 17, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium

O, Lucky Man! — Sun., Nov. 18, 7 p.m., at Muenzinger Auditorium



Music Faculty Series

www.colorado.edu/music

Fall 2007

The new expanded Music Faculty Series showcases University of Colorado-Boulder College of Music faculty performances. Faculty Series recitals are held at 7:30 p.m. on most Tuesdays and at 4:30 p.m. on selected Sundays in Grusin Music Hall in the Imig Music Building, 18th Street and Euclid Avenue, CU-Boulder campus. All performances are free and open to the public.

Tuesday, Sept. 4, 7:30 p.m.
And All That Jazz
Michael Thornton, horn; Margaret McDonald, piano; J. Michael Dunn, tuba

Sunday, Sept. 9, 4:30 p.m.
Welcoming Professor Joel Burcham
Joel Burcham, tenor

Tuesday, Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m.
Across the Pacific: Music from Japan and the U.S.
Mutsumi Moteki, piano with Tamara Goldstein, piano; Bonnie Draina, soprano; and Jennie Dorris, marimba

Sunday, Sept. 16, 4:30 p.m.
Christina Jennings, flute

Tuesday, Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m.
Las Puertas del Tiempo: the Music of Luis Jorge Gonzalez
Alejandro Cremaschi, piano, and friends

Tuesday, Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m.
A Love Supreme
John Gunther, jazz saxophone, and friends

Tuesday, Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m.
Doug Walter, vibraphone, and friends

Tuesday, Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m.
The Piano Music of Carter Pann
Barry Snyder, piano

Tuesday, Oct. 30, 7:30 p.m.
With a Little Help From My Friends
Geraldine Walther, viola, and friends

Sunday, Nov. 4, 4:30
The Lehnert Solo/Duo and Family
Oswald Lehnert, violin, and Doris Pridonoff Lehnert, piano

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m.
Parables for Brass
The Colorado Brass Quintet

Tuesday, Nov. 27, 7:30 p.m.
Judith Ingolfsson, violin

Tuesday, Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m.
Quartets Plus! Chamber Music of Daniel Kellogg
College ofMusic Events

Every year, the College of Music presents more than 300 diverse events, many of which are free. In addition to the series outlined above, the College presents faculty recitals, ensemble performances, visiting artists, student recitals and much more. Some highlights include the Pendulum: New Music at CU performance series and musicology colloquia exploring various fascinating topics of music scholarship. For a listing of most events, visit the College of Music web site at www.colorado.edu/music and visit the events calendar.



CU Opera

www.cuconcerts.org

CU Opera director William Gustafson and music director Nicholas Carthy are building one of the country's most exciting university programs featuring outstanding student vocalists. Fully staged productions with live orchestras complement these competition-winning performers, many of whom already have contracts to perform in opera houses around the world.

Dead Man Walking
By Jake Heggie and Terrence
McNally
Friday, Oct. 26, at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 27, at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 28, at 2 p.m.
Macky Auditorium

Since its premiere in 2000, Dead Man Walking, the first opera by composer Jake Heggie and librettist Terrence McNally, has become one of the opera world's most performed new works. Commissioned by San Francisco Opera (then headed by Lotfi Mansouri), it is based on the prize-winning book by Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ, and tells the modern-day story of a nun who becomes the spiritual advisor to a condemned man on Louisiana's death row. The opera was first performed on Oct. 7, 2000, at San Francisco's War Memorial Opera House.

Holiday Festival
Friday, Dec. 7, at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, at 4 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 8, at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 9, at 4 p.m.
Macky Auditorium

It's hard to pick just one reason that the CU-Boulder Holiday Festival sells out every year. Some longtime concertgoers mention the lively program of favorite seasonal music while others love the festive holiday decorations in Macky Auditorium. Whatever your reason for loving the Holiday Festival, the College of Music's choirs, orchestra, ensembles and faculty soloists invite you to share this joyous celebration with family and friends.

Avoid standing in line for your tickets to the popular Holiday Festival by becoming a 2007-2008 CU Concerts season ticket holder. Individual tickets for the Holiday Festival go on sale to the general public on Sept. 23, 2007. No discounts are available for this concert.

Die Fledermaus
By Johann Strauss
Friday, March 14, 2008, at 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 16, 2008, at 2 p.m.
Macky Auditorium

Die Fledermaus (The Bat) is a sumptuous Viennese bonbon followed by a sparkling champagne toast. A rich blend of masquerades and merriment, this operetta is an intoxicating tonic for the spirit. Johann Strauss' celebrated score, with effervescent waltzes and polkas, celebrates the dreamlike opulence of old Vienna. This production will be sung in English.

The Cunning Little Vixen
By Leos Janácek
Thursday, April 24, 2008, at 7:30 p.m.
Friday, April 25, 2008, at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 26, 2008, at 7:30p.m.
Sunday, April 27, 2008, at 2 p.m.
Music Theatre, Imig Music Building

Fiercely independent, Vixen Sharp-Ears escapes captivity and raises a large family with Fox. After Vixen's untimely death at the hands of a poacher, her memory remains in the form of her daughter who looks exactly like her mother. Concertgoers of all ages will enjoy Janácek's thrilling music and this enchanting tale of love, death and re-birth. This production will be sung in English.



Boulder Weekly/CU Centerstage Calendar '07-'08

September 2007

1 Sat Concerts — Yonder Mountain String Band, Fox Theatre ($)

Program Council — Ben Harper, Macky Auditorium ($)

2 Sun Concerts — P.O.S., Fox Theatre ($)

4 Tues Concerts — Rocco DeLuca, Fox Theatre ($)

Music Faculty Series — And All That Jazz, Grusin Music Hall

5 Wed Concerts — Angie Stevens, Fox Theatre ($)

Macky Gallery — Lois Ward, Macky Auditorium (through Oct. 3)

6 Thu Concerts — Kinsey Sicks, Fox Theatre ($)

7 Fri Concerts — Built to Spill, Fox Theatre ($)

8 Sat Concerts — Built to Spill, Fox Theatre ($)

9 Sun Music Faculty Series — Welcoming Professor Joel Burchan, Grusin Music Hall

10 Mon Concerts — Bebel Gilberto, Fox Theatre ($)

11 Tues Concerts — Ryan Shaw, Fox Theatre ($)

Music Faculty Series — Across the Pacific: Music from Japan and the US, Grusin Music Hall

12 Wed Concerts — Against Me!, Boulder Theater ($)

Concerts — Dubconscious, Fox Theatre ($)

International Film Series — Chris Meloni (in person), Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

13 Thu Concerts — Joe Bonamassa, Fox Theatre ($)

Concerts — Shooter Jennings, Boulder Theater ($)

International Film Series — The Guatemalan Handshake, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Museum — Open House, CU Museum of Natural History

14 Fri International Film Series — Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Museum — CU Museum Highlights Tours, Museum Lobby

15 Sat Concerts — Baby Loves Disco, Boulder Theater ($)

16 Sun Concerts — Reckless Kelly, Fox Theatre ($)

International Film Series — Brand Upon the Brain!, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Music Faculty Series — Christina Jennings — flute, Grusin Music Hall

17 Mon Museum — CU Museum Highlights Tours, Museum Lobby

18 Tue College of Music — Wind Symphony & Symphonic Band Concert, Macky Auditorium

Concerts — Baka Beyond, Boulder Theater ($)

Museum — CU Museum Highlights Tours, Museum Lobby

19 Wed Concerts — James Hunter, Fox Theatre ($)

Concerts — John McLaughlin & the 4th Dimension, Boulder Theater ($)

International Film Series — Killer of Sheep, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

20 Thu Artist Series — Arturo Sandoval, Macky Auditorium ($)

Concerts — They Might Be Giants, Boulder Theater ($)

International Film Series — Pierrot le fou, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Museum — CU Museum Highlights Tours, Museum Lobby

21 Fri Concerts — Rose Hill Drive, Fox Theatre ($)

International Film Series — Ten Canoes, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

22 Sat Concerts — Charlie Hunter, Fox Theatre ($)

23 Sun Concerts — Bebel Gilberto, Fox Theatre ($)

Concerts — Global Drum Project, Boulder Theater ($)

Concerts — Takacs Quartet, Grusin Music Hall ($)

24 Mon Concerts — The New Pornographers, Boulder Theater ($)

Concerts — Takacs Quartet, Grusin Music Hall ($)

25 Tue Museum — Fall Color Tree Walk, CU Museum South Entrance

Music Faculty Series — Las Puertas del Tiempo: the Music of Luis Jorge Gonzales, Grusin Music Hall

26 Wed Concerts — Pendulum, Grusin Music Hall

Museum — Fall Color Tree Walk, CU Museum South Entrance

27 Thu Concerts — Japanese Music and Dance, Grusin Music Hall

Concerts — Particle, Fox Theatre ($)

International Film Series — Election, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

28 Fri College of Music — University Orchestra Concert, Macky Auditorium

International Film Series — Triad Election, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

29 Sat Concerts — Eric Johnson, Fox Theatre ($)

30 Sun International Film Series — Monty Python's Life of Brian, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

October 2007

2 Tuesday Music Faculty Series — Alejandro Cremaschi, Grusin Music Hall

3 Wed International Film Series — Toi et Moi, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Music Faculty Series — Clavier Trio with David Korevaar, Grusin Music Hall

4 Thu Concerts — Klaxons, Fox Theatre ($)

International Film Series — Bled Number One, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

5 Fri Artist Series — Stories From the Edge of the World: Ensemble Galilei and Neil Conan, Macky Auditorium ($)

Dance — B.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

International Film Series — La Trahison, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

6 Sat Dance — B.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

International Film Series — Ma Vie en L'air, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

7 Sun Dance — B.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

9 Tues Concerts — Groundation, Fox Theatre ($)

Music Faculty Series — A Love Supreme — Jazz, Grusin Music Hall

10 Wed International Film Series — Into Great Silence, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Macky Gallery — Susan Eriksson, Macky Auditorium (through Nov. 7)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

11 Thu Concerts — Raq, Fox Theatre ($)

International Film Series — The Pornographers, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

12 Fri Concerts — Jazz Ensemble, Grusin Music Hall

International Film Series — Tale of a Gypsy Caravan, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

13 Sat Concerts — Lucero, Fox Theatre ($)

Concerts — New West Electronic Arts & Music Organization, ATLAS Black Box Performance Space

International Film Series — No End in Sight, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

14 Sun Artist Series — Yamato, Macky Auditorium ($)

Music Faculty Series — Berton and Mildred Coffin Memorial Concert, Grusin Music Hall

International Film Series — Sound of the Soul, ATLAS 102 ($)

Theatre — Here I Am I Stay, University Theatre Mainstage ($)

15 Mon CU Music — Guitar Ensemble, Grusin Music Hall

16 Tues Concerts — The Tragically Hip, Boulder Theater ($)

Music Faculty Series — Doug Walter — vibraphone, Grusin Music Hall

17 Wed International Film Series — Manufactured Landscapes, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

18 Thu Concerts — Dark Star Orchestra, Boulder Theater ($)

Concerts — Josh Ritter, Fox Theatre ($)

International Film Series — Pigs and Battleships, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Museum — Chocolate, Paleontology Hall

19 Fri Concerts — Aesop Rock, Fox Theatre ($)

CU Music — Jazz Ensemble and Wind Symphony, Grusin Music Hall

International Film Series — Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

20 Sat Museum — Day of the Dead Art Exhibit, Museum 2nd Floor Gallery (through Nov. 20)

21 Sun CU Music — Percussion Ensemble, Grusin Music Hall

International Film Series — Darkon, ATLAS 102 ($)

22 Mon Concerts — Chevelle, Boulder Theater ($)

23 Tues Music Faculty Series — The Piano Music of Carter Pann, Grusin Music Hall

24 Wed International Film Series — Dead Man Walking, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Museum — Day of the Dead Altars Exhibit, Museum Changing Gallery (through Nov. 10)

Opera — Brown Bag Preview, Music Theatre

25 Thu International Film Series — The Draughtsman's Contact, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

26 Fri CU Opera — Dead Man Walking, Macky Auditorium ($)

International Film Series — A Zed and Two Noughts, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

Opera — Dead Man Walking, Macky Auditorium ($)

27 Sat International Film Series — Exiled, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Opera — Dead Man Walking, Macky Auditorium ($)

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

28 Sun Concerts — Menomena, Fox Theatre ($)

Concerts — Takacs Quartet, Grusin Music Hall ($)

Opera — Dead Man Walking, Macky Auditorium ($)

29 Mon Concerts — Takacs Quartet, Grusin Music Hall ($)

30 Tues Music Faculty Series — With a Little Help From My Friends, Grusin Music Hall

31 Wed International Film Series — Antonioni and Bergman, ATLAS 102 ($)

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

November 2007

1 Thu International Film Series — The Insect Woman, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

2 Fri Dance — M.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

International Film Series — Sundance Shorts, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Museum — Day of the Dead Community Celebration, CU Museum

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

3 Sat Concerts — Tegan and Sara, Boulder Theater ($)

Dance — M.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

Museum — Day of the Dead Family Day, CU Museum

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

4 Sun Concerts — Del tha Funky Homosapien, Fox Theatre ($)

Dance — M.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

International Film Series — Walking to Werner (with Alan Caudillo in person), ATLAS 102 ($)

Music Faculty Series — The Lehnert Solo/Duo and Family, Grusin Music Hall

Theatre — The London Merchant, Loft Theatre ($)

5 Mon Program Council — 12 Girls Band, Macky Auditorium ($)

6 Tues Music Faculty Series — Parables for Brass, Grusin Music Hall

7 Wed International Film Series — Bamako, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

8 Thu Artist Series — Boston Brass, Macky Auditorium ($)

International Film Series — The Profound Desire of the Gods, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

9 Fri International Film Series — SDIFF at IFS: Satellite Screenings, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

10 Sat International Film Series — SDIFF at IFS: Satellite Screenings, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

11 Sun International Film Series — SDIFF at IFS: Satellite Screenings, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

13 Tue College of Music — Wind Symphony & Symphonic Band Concert, Macky Auditorium

14 Wed Macky Gallery Ashley Mask Harris, Macky Auditorium (through Dec. 12)

15 Thu College of Music — University Orchestra Concert, Macky Auditorium

International Film Series — Vengeance is Mine, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Museum — Musical Instruments and Plants, Paleontology Hall

Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

16 Fri International Film Series — Milarepa, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Program Council — Brian Regan, Macky Auditorium ($)

Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

17 Sat International Film Series — Milarepa, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

18 Sun International Film Series — O., Lucky Man!, Muenzinger Auditorium ($)

27 Tues Music Faculty Series — Judith Ingolfsson — violin, Grusin Music Hall

28 Wed College of Music — CU Jazz Ensembles, Macky Auditorium

Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

21 Wed Concerts — Suzanna Vega, Boulder Theater ($)

29 Thu Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

30 Fri Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

December 2007

1 Sat Artist Series — Trio Medieval, Macky Auditorium ($)

Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

2 Sun Concerts — Youssou N'Dour, Boulder Theater ($)

Theatre — She Loves Me, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

4 Tues Music Faculty Series — Quartets Plus! Chamber Music of Daniel Kellogg, Grusin Music Hall

7 Fri Concerts — Holiday Festival, Macky Auditorium ($)

Dance — B.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

8 Sat Concerts — Holiday Festival, Macky Auditorium ($)

Dance — B.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

9 Sun Concerts — Holiday Festival, Macky Auditorium ($)

Dance — B.F.A. Dance Concert, Irey Theatre

January 2008

15 Wed Macky Gallery — AM Dirks, Macky Auditorium (through Feb. 13)

25 Fri Artist Series — Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, Macky Auditorium ($)

February 2008

14 Thu Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

15 Fri Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

16 Sat Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

20 Wed Macky Gallery — Lisa Call, Macky Auditorium (through March 19)

Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

21 Thu Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

22 Fri Artist Series — Piotr Anderszewski, Macky Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

23 Sat Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

24 Sun CU Music — Black Pioneers in Music, Macky Auditorium

Theatre — Cloud Nine, University Mainstage Theatre ($)

March 2008

4 Tue Artist Series — Peru Negro, Macky Auditorium ($)

6 Thu Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

7 Fri Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

8 Sat Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

12 Wed Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

13 Thu Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

14 Fri Opera — Die Fledermaus, Macky Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

15 Sat Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

16 Sun Opera — Die Fledermaus, Macky Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Holly Hughes, Loft Theatre ($)

April 2008

2 Wed Macky Gallery — Edward S. Curtis, Macky Auditorium (through April 30)

5 Sat Artist Series — The Eroica Effect, Macky Auditorium ($)

10 Thu Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

11 Fri Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

12 Sat Artist Series — ODC Dance, Macky Auditorium ($)

Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

16 Wed Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

17 Thu Dance — DanceWorks 2008, Irey Theatre

Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

18 Fri Dance — DanceWorks 2008, Irey Theatre

Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

19 Sat Dance — DanceWorks 2008, Irey Theatre

Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

20 Sun Dance — DanceWorks 2008, Irey Theatre

Theatre — Marat/Sade, Loft Theatre ($)

24 Thu Opera — The Cunning Little Vixen, Music Theatre at Imig ($)

25 Fri Opera — The Cunning Little Vixen, Music Theatre at Imig ($)

26 Sat Opera — The Cunning Little Vixen, Music Theatre at Imig ($)

27 Sun Opera — The Cunning Little Vixen, Music Theatre at Imig ($)

Check Boulder Weekly every Thursday for a weekly listing of arts and entertainment events in and around Boulder County.



CU-Boulder Department of Theatre & Dance

www.cutheatre.org

The upcoming 2007-08 season produced by the CU Department of Theatre and Dance features biographic representations (Here I Am I Stay), contemporary satire (Cloud Nine) and an original student production (Holly Hughes). In addition, the Master and Bachelor of Fine Arts concerts will showcase the variety of student choreography. Acclaimed guest artists Art Bridgman and Myrna Packer will also be in residence.

Theatre

Here I Am I Stay
Conceived and created by: Onye Ozuzu and Cecilia J. Pang
Oct. 4-6 & Oct. 10-14
A theatre and dance integrated process performance project based on the life and works of French sculptor Camille Claudel.
University Theatre Mainstage

The London Merchant
By George Lillo
Director: Oliver Gerland
Oct. 25-27, 31 & Nov. 1-4
Comic singing stages the classic moral tale in which a Christian businessman and a proto-feminist prostitute battle for the soul of an impressionable young man.
Loft Theatre

She Loves Me
By Joe Masteroff
Lyrics by Sheldon Harnick
Music by Jerry Bock
Director: Ben Saypol
Nov. 15-17, 28-30 & Dec. 1-2
A funny and intelligent musical based on a play by Miklos Laszlo.
University Theatre Mainstage

Cloud Nine
By Caryl Churchill
Director: Lynn Nichols
Feb. 14-16, 20-24
A touching and hilarious satire presenting a fantastic and zany parade of heterosexuals, homosexuals and bisexuals along with the entire kaleidoscope of relationships.
University Theatre Mainstage

Holly Hughes
March 6-8, 12-16
An original student-written piece.
Loft Theatre

Marat/Sade
By Peter Weiss
April 10-12, 16-20
The persecution and assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as performed by the inmates of the asylum of Charenton under the direction of the Marquis de Sade.
University Theatre Mainstage

Dance

Bachelor of Fine Arts Dance Concert
Oct. 5-7
Featuring work by Jessica Simpson & Summer Templin.
An engaging evening of original choreography.
Irey Theatre

Master of Fine Arts Dance Concert
Nov. 2-4
Featuring work by Valerie Gerry, Jeanine McCain & Vernon Windsor
Original choreographic work including film and live vocals.
Irey Theatre

Bachelor of Fine Arts Dance Concert
Dec. 7-9
Featuring work by Elizabeth Brent, Rachel Grote & Lindsay Pepple.
Talented young artists present a range of contemporary work.
Irey Theatre

DanceWorks 2008
April 17-20
Featuring innovative work by CU faculty and guest artists Art Bridgman and Myrna Packer.
Irey Theatre

CU-Boulder Department of Theatre & Dance

www.cutheatre.org

The upcoming 2006-07 season produced by the CU Department of Theatre and Dance, features two world premieres—All That I Have Lost: War in Poetry, Prose & Theatre and Mall-Mart (co-produced with Curious Theatre Company of Denver)—and exciting choreography by acclaimed dancer Rennie Harris. Additionally, professional dancer Gabe Masson will be in residence at CU 2006-07.

Theatre

All That I Have Lost
World premiere
Devised by Ray Kemble and others
Director: Lynn Nichols
October 5-7, 11-14 at 8 p.m.; October 15 at 2 p.m.
A fantastic compilation of poetry, prose and references from well-known plays, All That I Have Lost explores the experience of war in an entirely new and intriguing way.
University Theatre Mainstage

Arms And The Man
By George Bernard Shaw
Director: William C. Kovacsik
October 26-28 & November 1-4 at 8 p.m.; November 4 & 5 at 2 p.m.
Love, war, patriotism and heroism. Set in 1885, Shaw's classic Arms and The Man delves into the deepest facets of these ideas.
Loft Theatre

Grapes of Wrath
By John Steinbeck
Adapted for the stage by Frank Galati
Director: Cecilia Pang
November 16-18, 29-30 at 8 p.m. & December 1-2 at 8 p.m.; December 3 at 2 p.m.
An epic story of hardship, famine and survival.

Roulette
By Paul Weitz
Director: Chris Shonka
February 8-10, 14-17 at 8 p.m.; February 18 at 2 p.m.
University Theatre Mainstage
A dysfunctional family sitcom becomes an unpredictable farce in this seriously funny play by the director of American Pie.
Medea
By Euripides
Translated by Nicholas Rudall
Director: Cathy Hartenstein
March 1-3, 7-10 at 8 p.m.; March 10-11 at 2 p.m.
The story of the jealousy and revenge of a woman betrayed by her husband.
Loft Theatre

Mall-Mart
World premiere
Book by Joan Holden with Daniel Chumley
Lyrics and music by Bruce Barthol
Directed by Chip Walton
April 12-14, 17-21 8 p.m.; April 21 & 22 at 2 p.m.
World premiere of a new musical, co-produced with Curious Theatre Company, generously supported by The Roe Green Foundation.
University Theatre Mainstage

Dance
Master of Fine Arts Dance Concert
October 6-7 at 8 p.m.; October 8 at 2 p.m.
Featuring work by Tara Ray Jones, Marissa Hallo and Lindsay Pierce
A stimulating mix of film and original choreography. Irey Theatre

Master of Fine Arts Dance Concert
November 3-4 at 8 p.m.; November 5 at 2 p.m.
Featuring work by Leslie Merrill & Angie Yeowell
A unique multi-media offering of film and dance in-the-round. Irey Theatre

Bachelor of Fine Arts Dance Concert
December 8-9 at 8 p.m.; December 10 at 2 p.m.
Featuring work by Mimi Ferrie, Heidi Prendergast & Katie Trigg
Talented young artists present a range of contemporary work. Irey Theatre

DanceWorks 2007
March 15-17 at 8 p.m.; March 18 at 2 p.m.
Choreography by CU faculty & guest choreographer Rennie Harris
Faculty Dance Concert featuring exciting new work by Roser Visiting Artist Rennie Harris and guest faculty member Gabriel Masson.

Student Dance Concert
April 20-21 at 8 p.m.; April 22 at 2 p.m.
A spectrum of choreographic works representing the wide-ranging interests of CU dance students.
Irey Theatre



CU Museum of Natural History

www.cumuseum.colorado.edu/

Events Calendar
Aug. – Dec. 2007
The University of Colorado Museum of Natural History is located on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus, in the Henderson Building, at 15th and Broadway.
For further information on events, contact 303-492-6892 or http://cumuseum.colorado.edu.

Open House
Sept. 13
4-6 p.m.
Explore the museum's galleries, get hands-on with objects from our collection, and enjoy wonderful world music by Musical Missions. This event is in conjunction with the CU Arts & Culture Week.

Highlights Tours
Sept. 14, 17, 18, 20
12:05 p.m., Meet in the museum lobby.
Tour the museum's exhibits and learn about the highlights of the collections during one of the Highlights Tours. Offered on Sept. 14, 17, 18 and 20 at 12:05 p.m., lasting for 50 minutes. This event is in conjunction with the CU Arts & Culture Week.

Fall Color Tree Walk
Tue., Sept. 25 & Wed., Sept. 26
5 p.m., Meet at the south entrance of the museum
Get outside and enjoy the splendor of Boulder in the fall with Professor Yan Linhart of the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Learn about the unique characteristics of different types of trees on CU's campus and why the trees are so important to the history of the University.

Chocolate
Thu., Oct. 18
6 p.m., Paleontology Hall
Explore the delicious world of chocolate! This sweet program will include information on the botany, history and production of chocolate. Presenters include Tom Lemieux of the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Timothy Moley, owner and founder of Chocolove and Payson Sheets, professor of Anthropology.

Day of the Dead Art Exhibit
Sat., Oct. 20 – Tue., Nov. 20 2nd Floor Gallery

Day of the Dead Altars Exhibit
Wed., Oct. 24 – Sat., Nov. 10

Changing Gallery
Day of the Dead Community Celebration
Fri., Nov. 2
6 p.m.
Day of the Dead Family Day
Sat., Nov. 3
1-4 p.m.
Have fun with the hands-on activities that local artists and storytellers have prepared for you and learn more about Mexican culture!

Musical Instruments and Plants
Thu., Nov. 15
6-8 p.m., Paleontology Hall
Around the world and throughout history, people have transformed plants into musical instruments. Join ethnomusicologist John Galm and botanist Tom Lemieux to learn more about plants as musical instruments and enjoy a live musical demonstration.



Andrew J. Macky Gallery

www.colorado.edu/Macky/

Housed in historic Macky Auditorium, the Andrew J. Macky Gallery showcases local, regional and national artists throughout the academic year. The season opens with large-scale flowers in oil and watercolor by Lois Ward followed by Susan Erikson's drawings on wood; photographs by Ashley Mask Harris; mixed media by AM Dirks; and art quilts by Lisa Call. An exhibition of historic photos by famed photographer Edward S. Curtis closes the season in April. The gallery is free and open to the public on Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The gallery is also open to patrons during events in Macky Auditorium Concert Hall.

Lois Ward Sept. 5-Oct. 3

Susan Erikson Oct. 10-Nov. 7

Ashley Mask Harris Nov. 14-Dec. 12

AM Dirks Jan. 15-Feb. 13

Lisa Call Feb. 20-March 19

Edward S. Curtis Collection April 2-30



SPORTS

Football with spirit
Coach Dan Hawkins trains his players from the heart

by Thom Hill

Forgive those who got a chuckle during the team's media day in early August when the first thing out of University of Colorado head football coach Dan Hawkins' mouth was, "It's really great to be on the grass."

Hawkins, of course, was talking about the kind of grass that grows on the CU practice fields, not the kind CU students smoke during their annual 4/20 gathering. But still.

Two weeks earlier, when asked by reporters what was realistic to expect from his team, Hawkins responded: "I think realistic is what you tell your mind is realistic. Is it realistic for us to win the Big 12 Championship? Sure it is... I know it always sounds corny, but realistic is what you believe is realistic."

Coming off a 2-10 season in 2006, Hawkins' first in Boulder, one that included a loss to Division I-AA Montana State, some people might wonder what the coach has been smoking. But, see, Hawkins is a spiritual guy. And though he's a faithful Catholic, we're not talking religion here.

For Hawkins, coaching football is about teaching players to train their spirits as much as it is training their bodies or teaching them to pass, catch, block and punt. The coach believes football is about coming together collectively and achieving greater things than once thought possible by obliterating mental limitations.

The Buddha said, "All that we are is the result of what we have thought." You can bet if the Enlightened One were around today, Hawkins would be trying to hire him to coach the offensive line.

Hawkins invited a motivational speaker who, since the spring, preaches positive thinking during weekly talks with the team. The coach leads his group of muscle-bound student athletes through post-practice visualization exercises on a regular basis. Last year, he described defensive standout Abraham Wright as someone who plays with "spiritual abandon." (Even if few understood exactly what he meant, you can't argue with Wright's productivity — he led the Big 12 with 11.5 sacks.)

So when Hawkins says "realistic is what you believe is realistic," it gives a clue to what he's been trying to do the past 19 months at Colorado. He's been working to change how the players — and, for that matter, the football staff, administration, fans and alumni — think.

After a team practice in early August, there were positive signs that the players may have been paying attention to all the spiritual lessons of late. During that practice, two players kept fighting each other after the whistle had blown. It's a common thing in the heat of a late-summer scrimmage. But Hawkins noted how when the two players squared off, teammates jumped in to squash the skirmish so the team could quickly get back to business. That didn't always happen a year ago.

There were other encouraging aspects to the practice, as well. Hawkins called it one of the best since he's been in Boulder.

"I just think we're really starting to understand [how to] finish. We're understanding the tempo, we're understanding communication. We're understanding rallying back, and the little things," he said.

If Colorado is to bounce back from a two-win season this fall and get to a bowl game, not to mention the Big 12 Championship, it's going to take a whole lot of little things getting better. Here are some other things we believe:

Player To Watch, Offense: Bernard Jackson is the best CU player with the ball in his hands. He's just not the best player to direct the Colorado offense, like Jackson did a year ago as the team's starting quarterback. That role will fall to either redshirt-freshman Cody Hawkins or college transfer Nick Nelson, a junior. But Jackson needs to be involved, and coaches say they will use him at receiver, tailback, kick returner, as well as, occasionally, quarterback. Jackson even practiced as a defensive safety during the summer. That makes the senior from southern California a WR/TB/KR/QB/S. Jackson said he's looking forward to playing the "slash" role.

"I'm ecstatic about what they are doing and the direction they are taking the program," Jackson said. "Wherever the talent is needed, I am there. It's fun, and it gives me the chance to help this team and allows me to do great things for this program."

Player To Watch, Defense: Jordon Dizon grew up spear fishing and hunting wild boar with a knife in his native Kauai, Hawaii. The senior linebacker now spearheads the Colorado defense. He's always had great instincts on the field — he's the only true freshman to ever start the first game of the season under the tutelage of Colorado's legendary linebackers coach, Brian Cabral. Nowadays, Dizon uses his smarts, as well. Last year, Dizon led the team with 137 tackles, the most by a CU player since Ryan Sutter (you know, the guy who married Trista on The Bachelorette) in 1997.

Player To Watch, Special Teams: Placekicker Kevin Eberhart came to the Colorado Buffaloes from Broomfield the same year as Mason Crosby, and actually beat Crosby out of the kickoff duties prior to the first game that season. Crosby, of course, eventually took over all the placekicking jobs, then went on to become an All-American and broke the CU career scoring record. So what has Eberhart been up to the past three years? Besides kicking in practice, Eberhart used the time to finish his bachelors in aeronautical engineering and is even halfway done with a graduate degree in bioastronautics.

Now it's Eberhart's turn to engineer the ball through the uprights on Saturdays. "He is a solid kicker and may not have the same range as Mason, but few guys do," Dan Hawkins said. "He has a chance to be a very good kicker. He has good pop when the ball comes off his leg. I think he'll do some good things."

Key Games: Longtime fans are saying this might be the most enticing Colorado home schedule ever. The Buffs host Florida State (Sept. 15), Oklahoma (Sept. 29) and Nebraska (Nov. 23) — three teams ranked in the USA Today Coaches Preseason Top 25 poll — and another, Missouri (Nov. 3), likely to find itself in the Top 25 before too long. But — budding positive belief system or not — this Colorado team could still turn fragile if they lose the season opener vs. Colorado State on Sept. 1 at Invesco Field in Denver (10 a.m. kickoff). This Rams team should be better than the one that beat the Buffs in 2006. And Colorado State always seems to give Colorado their best shot, no matter the season. The Colorado players need some proof that their hard work and positive approach translates to a win on the field.

For more information on CU's football schedule, go to www.cubuffs.com. To order tickets, call 303-49BUFFS.


Hopeful harriers
CU's cross country teams have fast shoes to fill

by Thom Hill

Last year was another year and another national cross country title for the University of Colorado harriers. The men's squad pulled off an upset in Terre Haute, Ind., and took home the medal. Meanwhile, the women's team finished a better-than-expected second at the NCAA Championships. Since 2000, the men have captured three NCAA titles, while the women have brought home two.

But despite all the hardware sitting in the Dal Ward Center's trophy case, Colorado's head cross country coach, Mark Wetmore, doesn't feel like his team needs to live up to something special as they prepare for the 2007 season.

"Honestly, I don't feel any different expectations or pressures from year to year," Wetmore said. "We feel the same expectations and aspirations every year and that is to be the very best we can. If it adds up to a national championship, that's wonderful, but we are going to try as hard as we can no matter what."

Shoes to fill

Pressure or not, the men's team will be hard pressed to take the first-place podium in November after the NCAA Championship race set for Nov. 19, again in Terre Haute. The men's team returns just two runners — Stephen Pifer and Brent Vaughn — from last year's winning group. (James Strang transferred from the program, and the other four runners graduated.)

Vaughn, the senior who finished 8th at the NCAAs in 2006 and 4th in 2004, promises to be the team's No. 1 runner. He's coming off a solid summer of training, he said.

"This has probably been my best summer ever," Vaughn said. "I am hoping to build up to the highest mileage I have ever run before. I am really excited."

Pifer, who holds the school record in the mile, is hoping for a strong senior year, as well. He finished 10th in last year's NCAA cross country race. After Vaughn and Pifer, though, the team is largely untested.

That means Wetmore will need to identify several runners to fill out the top seven spots who will run in the NCAAs.

"Pete Janson, Chris Pannone, Kenyon Neuman, Bradley Harkrader, Seth DeMoor — it's a long list of guys in waiting, and we need two or three of them to make a step this year," Wetmore said.

A handful of incoming freshmen could also break into the scoring group by the end of the season. Among the youngsters is 2006 Colorado high school state cross country champion Richard Medina from Grand Junction. Medina will run unattached early in the season so as to preserve a possible redshirt season. But Wetmore said he wouldn't be surprised if the freshman was among the team's top seven runners come November.

"Rich is a wonderful runner, and I can't wait for people here to see him run," Wetmore said. "He is light on his feet and has a great willpower."

Watch out for the women

The women's team will be replacing some important runners, as well, after both Claire Maduza and Liza Pasciuto transferred from the program in recent months. Both were among the top-40 finishers at the NCAAs last fall. But senior Erin Marston said the women had their best summer of training since she's been at Colorado.

"All the women have been meeting and running together, and I'm just really excited," said Marston, who finished 131st at last year's NCAA Championships. "I think everyone's pretty determined. No one seems to be slacking on their training. We'll see what happens, but I have good feelings about it."

Also returning with NCAA Championship experience are junior Jenny Barringer and sophomores Emily Hanenberg, Hilary McClendon and Aislinn Ryan.

Ryan, the 2004 high school FootLocker National Champion, is coming off a strong freshman season, including a 9th-place finish at the Big 12 meet and her 37th-place finish at the NCAAs.

Marston has assumed a leadership role with the team, which includes six freshmen and six sophomores among its ranks.

"Since it is my last year I am trying to get the most out of my senior season," she said. "I am organizing the girls, meeting with them. Especially for the incoming freshmen, I am trying to talk with them and answer their questions because there is a huge difference between running for a high school and a Division I college."

Runner with the best shot at a national title

Barringer finished no lower than third place in every cross country race she ran last year, and won the Buffs' home meet, the Rocky Mountain Shootout. Barringer, who will be a junior this season, finished second at the NCAA Championships in 2006. A strong, gutsy runner, Barringer goes into this season after undergoing a unique training regimen during the summer.

Barringer's hopes of successfully defending her 2005 NCAA outdoor steeplechase crown last spring were derailed when a competitor stepped on her shoe during the 2006 NCAA steeplechase race. Barringer stopped to put the shoe back on and fought her way back to a respectable 7th-place finish.

Undeterred by the setback, two weeks later all Barringer did was set the collegiate 3,000-meter steeplechase record en route to winning the USATF race in Indianapolis. That earned her a spot on the U.S. team and a trip to the World Championships in Osaka, Japan, which are scheduled for Aug. 24 through Sept. 2. She's the youngest member of the U.S. contingent and one of only three collegiate competitors on the team.

The spot on the world team also meant a summer of cross-training for both the steeplechase and the cross country season.

"She's done a combination of both, which was to take a couple of weeks off at the end of outdoor track, and then resume the training as if she was getting ready for [the NCAA Cross Country Championships in] November, but with a little bit of [steeplechase] technique along the way," Wetmore said. "It's been a compromise, but myself and Coach [Heather] Burroughs and Jenny were all pretty confident that we have a good recipe that will lead to success in Osaka and success in Terre Haute — those two big capitals of the world."

Run with the buffaloes

The team's annual alumni/open/time trial tune-up race is set for Sept. 1 at the Buffalo Ranch on CU's South Campus. Men run at 8:30 a.m., and the women start at 9:15 a.m.

Colorado's annual home cross country meet, the Rocky Mountain Shootout, takes place this fall on Sept. 29 at the Buffalo Ranch. The open women race at 8:30 a.m., open men at 9:15 a.m.; the collegiate women start at 10 a.m., the collegiate men at 10:45 a.m.


The Freshman 15
You don't have to gain weight in college

by Andrea Tollefsrud

You've just settled into your new dorm and are beginning your new life as a college student. I'm sure you've heard all sorts of stories of what you will be facing: heavy class loads, tons of studying, the parties, no sleep. But did anyone ever warn you about the "freshman 15"? You know — those extra 15 pounds many college students put on during their first year away from home.

Well, the good news is that it isn't usually 15 pounds, but rather an average of between four and 10 pounds over their first two years, according to recent studies.

Some weight gain is normal at this age and juncture in a young adult's life. As you exit adolescence and enter young adulthood, your body's metabolism slows down and continues to slow down the remainder of your life. This usually does not pose enough of a problem to cause any significant weight gain. However, when combined with a multitude of other lifestyle changes, it can become problematic. It is important to understand what can contribute to the weight gain and make specific adjustments to your daily habits to maintain a healthy body and avoid the "freshman 15."

What are some causes to sudden weight gain?

You're away from home and out from under the watchful eyes of your parents. This newfound freedom can cause some students to make poor decisions about what, when and how much they eat and drink.

Poor mealtime eating habits: Meal Cards and "munch money" are almost like a credit card without limits. Students often use these at the buffet-style cafeteria to access a variety of all-you-can-eat food choices. Build-your-own waffles for breakfast. Stack-your-own deli sandwiches for lunch. Pile-it-on pizzas for dinner. Once you swipe your card, you can eat as much as you want for as long as you can stand. And most of the foods on the menu are high in fat and calorie-dense, so you have to be quite savvy at making healthy meal choices.

When you add to the mix late-night snacks of nachos, pretzels, chips and cookies from the vending machines; quick "meals" in the dorm such as Instant Ramen; and eating out on cheap, "super-sized" burritos and fast food, it's a recipe for rapid weight gain.

Alcohol consumption: Hey, it's college. Of course you're going to be drinking and going to parties. Despite it being illegal for those under the age of 21, some students consume copious amounts of alcohol (binge drinking) almost nightly. Alcohol has between 90 and 150 calories per drink (12 oz. of beer, 5 oz. of wine, 1 oz. of liquor) and offers no nutritional value, but it does give you lots of excess calories that can quickly add up to more than half of what your daily caloric intake should be. Multiply that by six or seven times a week, and you've got yourself a "beer belly." Let's not forget those late-night munchies that are usually stimulated by alcohol consumption and the fact that alcohol diminishes your sense of fullness. Add to that the fact that alcohol interferes with your body's ability to absorb, store and utilize what limited nutrients may be found in those munchie-foods, and you have the makings of malnutrition.

Lack of adequate exercise: College life is a big change from high school in terms of exercise and athletic activities. A combination of being too busy with classes and studying, not participating in an organized sport, being physically idle a lot of the time, and sometimes taking the shuttle to classes really slows down your metabolism and offers very little offset to the excessive eating and drinking you may be doing.

These and many other factors can contribute to some weight gain. But it's not all doom and gloom. You are an adult now. You have a personal responsibility for yourself, your behaviors and your lifestyle choices. It's important to realize that good nutrition is essential to functioning optimally because it can affect your performance academically, your overall health, your moods and even your relationships.

By arming yourself with a bit of knowledge about proper nutrition, what foods are high in calories, good exercise habits and other "good" habits, you can maintain a very healthy body and avoid any significant weight gain. You might even get in great physical shape and lose some weight. Let's explore how:

Be informed — Take a course in nutrition, consult with a nutritionist or dietitian, pick up a book on the subject and read it. Only you can be responsible for yourself and what you eat. Best to know as much as you can so you can learn to navigate the buffets and make sound decisions about the rest of your diet on a consistent basis.

Choose whole foods — This means foods in their most basic form — nothing processed, nothing loaded with hydrogenated oils, high-fructose corn syrup, or foods with multiple ingredients that you can't identify. Eat fresh fruit and vegetables, lean meats and eggs, cheeses (low-fat/skim), low-fat dairy, whole-grain breads, grains, cereals and occasional pastas. Avoid baked goods like cookies and cakes, fried foods, foods drenched in "butter," high-fat salad dressings, pizza, etc. Keep it simple.

Exercise — Try to find a minimum of 30 to 45 minutes of time in your day to get in a workout. This can be several brisk walks across campus or to do errands, bike commuting, running, hiking in the nearby foothills, taking a swim, lifting weights at the recreation center or taking a scheduled fitness class. Find a workout partner to join you. Hire a personal fitness trainer. Just make it fun, be consistent and have a positive attitude about exercise, knowing that you're doing something good for yourself.

Watch those portions — One of the main causes of weight gain is overeating. It's easy when there is no limit to the foods you can pile on your plate. Know what proper portions are. Usually, you can rely on the palm of your hand or a deck of cards to be a serving of meat or meat substitute, your fist for a serving of starchy foods or grains/cereals, and two fists for a serving of vegetables. Anything beyond that is too much. If you can't resist loading up your plate, eat half of it during your meal, and take the rest back with you to your dorm for another small meal later when you need it.

Structure — Make sure you eat three to five small meals at regular times throughout the day. Eat when you are truly hungry or when you feel your blood sugar dropping. Schedule nutritious snacks (bring your own snacks with you), and drink at least 64 ounces (two liters) of purified water each day.

Food journal — Keep a daily food record of everything you've eaten and include the time you ate, what you ate (get detailed), the quantity of the foods, where you ate it and how you were feeling when you ate. This is a useful tool to help you track your eating patterns in case you notice you've been inching your way up the scale.

Limit beverage consumption — First and foremost, watch your alcohol consumption. Remember, alcohol offers little in the way of nutrition — vitamins and minerals that feed your brain and fuel your body — and is high in calories when over-consumed. Also, be aware that sodas — diet or regular — can contribute to weight gain. They also tend to displace valuable nutrients you could get from good foods if they act as a meal replacement. Same goes for those lattes and "frappuccinos," and even sugary fruit "juices."

Other helpful tips — Take control of your eating environment. You can have a small dorm refrigerator and microwave in your room, and sometimes there are small kitchens available in the dorm building. Buy your own food and do your own cooking. There are plenty of cookbooks available at the used bookstores to give you simple ideas for meals.

Remember, you are now responsible for yourself and how you treat your body. If you keep a positive attitude about eating, treat your body with respect by caring about what you put into it and arm yourself with some sound information on basic nutrition, you will feel better, look better and perform better.

If you begin to feel overwhelmed about eating and about your weight to a point of obsessing, or notice that you are bingeing, fasting or purging after eating, you should seek guidance from a doctor or counselor at the student health center immediately.

The following are useful tools and resources to help you become more responsible with your lifestyle and diet.

Go to http://www.mypyramid.gov to help personalize your eating plan, and also buy the "2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans" for a very thorough overview of proper diet.

The book series 30-Minute Meals by Rachel Ray offers quick, healthful and easy recipes.

The book Avoid the Freshman 15 — Guide to College Weight Loss by Diana Keuilian offers great advice.

Visit the website www.pubmed.gov and also www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus for a plethora of information on diet and health.

Andrea Tollefsrud is a certified nutritionist and personal trainer with Mountains Edge Fitness Center.


Ski U
Hey, you came here to major in fresh powder, didn't you?

by Isaac Woods Stokes

Don't ever mistake the purpose of higher education for anything other than what it really is — your chance to bank triple-digit ski days in Colorado's high country, the finest ski setting in the lower 48. You're the master of your own destiny and daytimer at "Ski U," and we highly recommend you milk it. It's your job.

Sadly, there is, indeed, a real world looming behind the flagstone towers of CU, where other jobs exist with bosses that don't dig on midweek ski days... not so much. But as the CEO, CFO and overall autocrat of You Inc., you can sign off on as many snowy mental-health days as needed. Here's the complex process.

You: "Uh, can I take the day off, ditch class, blow off all my life's responsibilities, academic and otherwise, because it's dumping profusely in the mountains, and mostly just because I feel like it?"

A nanosecond passes before you answer yourself, "Sure, dude. No worries."

Nothing to it. Tough love just isn't part of ski lingo, friend.

But where, oh, where to turn 'em? It's an embarrassment of riches here in the highest state in the U.S. (average mean elevation of 6,800 y'all. Thank you, Wikipedia! Who needs to study when you have high-speed internet access?). You need goals in life, and skiing each one of Colorado's two dozen (count 'em!) ought to be paramount. Each and every one of them can offer up a memory for life if you hit the hill on the right day. Get to know your local weather person (Marty Coniglio on Channel 9 rocks, hairstyle aside), get a Colorado Gazetteer, get signed up for powder alerts and get some damn good snow tires for you car.

Eldora

This is going to be your "go to" hill, and the reasons why are multiple. Numero Uno, the place is damned close. Less than 25 miles from The Hill, you can get there via the canyon, which is almost universally snow and traffic free. (Drive I-70 once, and you'll know what we're talking about.) You can also take the bus for free with your student bus pass. Yep, we said "free," Holmes.

Nextly, the Student Ski Pass is $129, which isn't free but compared to the price of a pass at a corporate resort seems like the next best thing to free. The inside line on the Eldora Student pass is this — the pass is not available at Eldora.com or at the mountain itself, so you want to look for one of the on-campus pass sales, the first of which is Friday, Sept. 7, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. So you know exactly where to be at 9:59 a.m. that Friday morning with coffee and credit card in hand. The offer is available to full-time students (maybe that night class is starting to look palatable after all) at any accredited university, and you need your valid student ID. The Eldora reps will be making the rounds to all the local schools, so check Eldora.com for the dates and times.

Eldora might have a few rocks, but a rocking ski soul is what really sets it apart. Great tree skiing, a super-friendly community vibe, and some of the steepest pitches in Colorado (true story!) make Eldora a stellar home base. You may actually need to do some studying and recon to find the stashes, but they are there, and they are, indeed, tasty. www.eldora.com

Aspen

It's pronounced "Ahh-spen," but while the town may harbor plenty of poseurs and Bogner one-piece ski suits (oh, the humanity!), the mountain is the real deal. Actually, when you're talking about Aspen, pronunciation aside, you're actually talking about four mountains: Ajax, Highlands, Buttermilk and Snowmass. Ajax gives you ripping off-camber steeps. Highland offers sick backcountry hiking into Highlands Bowl. Buttermilk is jibber paradise, and Snowmass is like Vail with one-tenth of the people. That is your CliffsNotes for the resort, but it's up to you to drill down into this subject matter on your own time.

The town is well respected for its nightlife and music scene, and that may take some firsthand verification on your part, as well. The "shrines" on Ajax mountain for John Denver, Jimi Hendrix and Jerry Garcia, among others, are must-visits. Bring something to burn as an offering; you won't be alone in your memorial activities.

If you're clever, you can add four days of skiing at Aspen/Snowmass onto your Eldora Student Pass for $129 by buying the supplement ($199 for seven days). Deal! That's $32.25 for those of you without advanced calculus skillz. You must purchase before Oct. 14.

Silverton

This is the bumper sticker you want on your car, and this is the ski experience you want on your ski resume. The mountain that opened up big-mountain, au natural, pucker-factor, no-fall free-riding to the public is doable for a weekend trip for the devoted. The drive lasts seven hours, the memories for a lifetime. The $699 Unguided Ski Pass says a lot about the mountain's mentality. For those seven Franklins you get access to unguided skiing from Dec. 1 to Feb. 12 and April 4-27, plus four free days of skiing at A-Basin, five free days at Monarch, and six free days at Purgatory and walk-on guided skiing for $79. If that's not enough, you also get free use of the summer mountain-bike park, $2 microbrew drafts and... a free Red Bull for each day you ski. Thought you'd like that! That's money well spent. www.silvertonmountain.com



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